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T. F. Terzis, MD, PhD
& Assosiates

PRIVATE EAR, NOSE & THROAT
CLINIC

CONTACT

ATHENS RHINOLOGY TEAM

Dr. T. Terzis and Associates
Private Ear, Nose & Throat Surgery

11 Dimitriou Vassileiou street
154 51 Neo Psychiko, Athens, Greece.
Tel.: (+30) 210 36 32 922
         (+30) 697 22 64 464
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Email: info@art-orl.com

 

Cochlear Implants


Cochlear ImplantsIn cases where the organ of hearing has a severe loss of sensory cells and hearing is at levels of total or near-total deafness, modern technology provides the ability of direct stimulation of auditory nerve endings inside the cochlea, by means of an implanted electrode.

The Cochlear Implant consists of the following parts:

  1. A microphone
  2. A speech processor which is directly connected to the microphone and is placed behind the pinna, looking like a BTE (behind the ear) hearing aid.
  3. An external transmitter connected with wire to the speech processor.
  4. A receiver/stimulator, magnetically coupled with the transmitter, which is implanted under the skin.
  5. A multichannel electrode, which is implanted inside the cochlea.

The sound is collected by the external microphone, and is initially filtered by the speech processor, to pick up speech frequencies and to drop unwanted noise. The transmitter presents the processed sound to the receiver/stimulator, which converts it to electric impulses. Finally, the multichannel electrode uses the coded electric signal to directly stimulate different parts of the auditory nerve inside the cochlea.

The sound is collected by the external microphone, and is initially filtered by the speech processor, to pick up speech frequencies and to drop unwanted noise. The transmitter presents the processed sound to the receiver/stimulator, which converts it to electric impulses. Finally, the multichannel electrode uses the coded electric signal to directly stimulate different parts of the auditory nerve inside the cochlea.

In the case of child deafness, the aim is to identify the condition as early as possible, in order to implant the child before the age of six months, for maximum benefit in communication and speech development. Children Cochlear Implantation Programmes are run by a multi-disciplinary team, consisting of surgeons, audiologists, speech therapists, psychologists, social workers and technicians. After selection and implantation, a long follow-up procedure is initiated, for technical adjustments, speech rehabilitation, psychological support and social interventions, when necessary.